MLB Top 100: The Best Baseball Players of All Time, 90-81

Last Updated: Jun 28th 2022   Published: Jun 17th 2022   3 Min Read
MLB Top 100: The Best Baseball Players of All Time, 90-81
Image ©J. Kyle Keener, DETROIT FREE PRESS, Detroit Free Press via Imagn Content Services, LLC

Well, time to keep this rolling. Yesterday we did 100-91, so now it’s time to see who rounds out our bottom 20. If you want to bet on this current MLB season, you can be sure to do so on any of these New Jersey Online Casinos.

#90. Al Kaline, OF

Al Kaline was one of the most highly touted prospects in MLB history. After signing with the Tigers, Kaline skipped the minor leagues altogether and went straight to the big leagues. In his second full season, Kaline posted a .340 batting average and collected his first and only 200-hit season, hitting 27 home runs and 102 RBIs while he was at it.

#89. Al Simmons, OF

Double Al! Al Simmons first started playing for the Philadelphia Athletics in 1924, and immediately came out the gate firing with a .308 average and 100+ RBIs. Simmons then went on to start his career with ELVEN STRAIGHT 100+ RBI seasons, and in each of those seasons he had an average of above .300.

#88. Gary Carter, C

Gary ‘The Kid’ Carter was an integral part of the 1986 World Series champion Mets, and is one of the best catchers of all time. The 11x All-Star had nine 20+ home run seasons, and his 324 career home runs are tied for fifth all-time amongst catchers.

#87. Ed Walsh, SP

Ed Walsh won 40 games in 1908. What’s even crazier than that is that’s not even his most impressive statistic. Walsh finished his 14-year career with a 1.89 ERA, which is the lowest career ERA for any pitcher who was accumulated more than 1000 innings pitched. Between 1907-1912 Walsh pitched 197 complete games, 42 of which were shutouts.

#86. Brooks Robinson, 3B

Brooks Robinson won 16 consecutive Gold Glove awards and made 18 All-Star teams. While the stats may not be as flashy as other players on this list, he is by far one of the most consistent players in baseball history. His 1964 MVP award was the only of his career, but outside of that year, he helped the Orioles grab two World Series Championships.

#85. Rafael Palmeiro, 1B

Steroids shmeroids. Palmeiro finished his career with 3,000+ hits and 500+ home runs, and he finished in the MVP standings in nine of his 20 seasons. From 1995 to 2003, Palmeiro finished each season with 38+ home runs and 100+ RBIs, and he wasn’t bad with his glove either, proven by his 3 Gold Glove Awards.

#84. Juan Marichal, SP

Marichal pitched for 16 seasons and only finished with a losing record three times–all the while he maintained a 2.89 ERA. He’s won more games than any other pitcher in the 1960s–and that includes pitchers that are much later down on this list such as Sandy Koufax and Bob Gibson.

#83. Carl Hubbell, SP

Hubbell was pretty much Juan Marichal, just forty years earlier. Hubbell pitched from 1928-1943 for the New York Giants, and only finished with a losing record once. Hubbell was a 9x All-Star and 2x MVP, and was a key part of the Giants' 1933 World Series championship.

#82. Vladimir Guerrero, OF

Guerrero’s career .318 batting average is the 48th best career batting average of all time, so it should be no shock that he’s on this list. The 9x All-Star and 8x Silver Slugger had his career peak in 2004, when the won the MVP Award after hitting 39 home runs and 126 RBIs, all while hitting .331.

#81. Ozzie Smith, SS

The Wizard of Oz would be much higher (lower?) on this list if he just had a bit more offensive production. The 13x Gold Glove award winner is hands down the best fielding shortstop of all time, but his career .262 batting average is hard to get by. Smith made up for his lack of offense with his base running though, stealing 580 bases throughout his career.

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